Heavy Metals in Commercial Food for Infants and Small Children Origin from the Sarajevo Market

Document Type : Original Article

Authors

1 University of Sarajevo, Faculty of Pharmacy, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina

2 Institute for Public Health of Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina

10.22034/jchr.2021.1917948.1232

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine total mercury, lead and cadmium contents in commercial food for infants and small children marketed on the Sarajevo area of Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) and to estimate the toxicological risk associated with the consumption of food for infants and small children regarding mercury, lead and cadmium. A total of 30 samples were analysed. The content of lead and cadmium was analysed by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Total mercury content was measured with a direct mercury analyser. The limits of cadmium, lead and inorganic mercury for infants and small children was calculated according to the dietary intake limits established by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and recommended body weights for European toddlers and infants. Overall, the contents of lead, mercury and cadmium in analyzed commercial food for infants and small children samples were considered quite low. Depending on the frequencies of daily usage the ready for use products for infants and small children there is the some circumstances in which exposure to lead and cadmium appeared to be of health concern.

Keywords


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